I Voted – Where’s the Confetti?

wevotedI took my daughter with me to vote this afternoon. #1,779 in our ward. We were in and out of the polling place in about three minutes. It went by so fast, that I was honestly a little disappointed! Not that I wanted to spend hours in line with a two-year-old, necessarily, but it just seems like it should be a bigger deal. We’ve been talking about this election for so long. Also, we may be making history with the first female president. I wanted someone to shoot off confetti after I voted, or something!

I honestly said to the poll worker after I turned my ballot in, “That’s it? I’m all done?”

We grabbed our “I voted” stickers and exited the building. I attempted a selfie, but my photo didn’t turn out great. Too bad no one else was around to snap a better picture.

After that, we headed to the library. My daughter was in dire need of a choo, choo movie (aka Thomas & Friends). Filling in the bubble on my ballot for Hillary Clinton had been strangely emotional for me – not enough to bring tears, but I felt a little choked up. Holding my daughter in the voting booth with me, it felt important, and I felt incredibly proud and lucky. Now we’re at home, watching and waiting along with the rest of the nation to find out who will be the next president of the United States.

Baby’s Book of the Week: Dr. Seuss’s ABC

babysbookoftheweekDuring our most recent trip to the library, Baby thought it would spice things up to walk down the aisles and pull books from the shelves at random! This kept me on my toes, but also introduced us to some cute books we might not have noticed otherwise. We read Where Do Balloons Go? by author and actor Jamie Lee Curtis and Mommy Calls Me Monkeypants – which is just such a great title! At home, Baby has been really into Dr. Seuss’s ABC book. I have to read it over and over, and it is a bit of a tongue twister, let me tell you.

imageLike all Dr. Seuss books, the ABC book has great rhythm, rhyme, and (most importantly for an alphabet book) alliteration. “Big A. Little a. What begins with A? Aunt Annie’s alligator. A….a…..A.” Each letter of the alphabet has several examples of words beginning with that letter. Some are normal; for example, the letter B is for barber, baby, bubbles, and a bumblebee. However, some are silly or even made up. For instance, the letter Z is for the Zizzer-Zazzer-Zuzz. The illustrations are classically Seuss, with simple pops of color. This is a book both parents and children can enjoy.

This Week’s Honorable Mention:
The Christmas Story by Jane Werner Watsonimage

This is a Little Golden Book, originally published in 1952. As the title suggests, it tells the story of Jesus’s birth. My daughter received this book as a gift from her great-grandmother. The first day she got it, Baby carried it around the house for hours. People tried to read it to her, but she wouldn’t have any of that! Weeks later, I still haven’t been able to read more than the first few pages to her. She just likes to carry it around. Sometimes she will sit and flip through the pages on her own. This is okay. I know she’ll read it some day. I’m sure we will pull it out every Christmas. For now, I’m glad to see that she isn’t trying to eat the book or rip the pages. She’s learning to treat books nicely, and that’s an important skill, too.

A Trip to Nonfiction Land

magicroom

A quick search on the library’s card catalog leads me an entire floor away from the Young Adult section I usually select my books from. I follow the book spines until I find 306.874 and pull out The Magic Room: A Story About The Love We Wish For Our Daughters by Jeffrey Zaslow. The book comes as a recommendation, and I’m looking forward to trying something new.

In a small town in Michigan, its 1,100 residents are outnumbered by wedding dresses. That’s right—wedding dresses. The most prominent business is town is Becker’s Bridal. Handed down through several generations of Becker women, the business caters to brides searching for the perfect dress for their wedding day. Since the shop is in an old bank, the vault has been transformed into the Magic Room: a room full of mirrors where brides can envision themselves as beautiful brides. Author Jeffrey Zaslow (best known for co-authoring The Last Lecture with Randy Pausch) explores the inner workings of the business and its history, as well as the lives of the brides who venture into the store. The book shows readers not to judge someone by what they look like on the outside. Someone may appear to be a happy bride on the lookout for a perfect dress, but they may have a back story full of heartache. Death of a parent, divorce, and a terrible car accident are just a few of the tales the brides share with the author. Zaslow also focuses on the love parents and caretakers wish for their daughters. While reality television sometimes only shows an obnoxious view of brides and the bridal industry, Zaslow’s story shares a deeper, more loving side.

After reading the book, I know that nonfiction is still not my favorite genre, but I feel good about stretching my reading limbs. Next, I’m on to Ann Brashares’ The Here and Now…yup, back to Young Adult!

Do you have any nonfiction books to recommend?